Homemade AC — The «Copper Coil» Air Cooler! — (Simple «Box Fan» Conversion) — Easy DIY



Homemade AC air cooler! The «Copper Coil» Air Cooler! how to make a non-compressor based DIY air conditioner using a box fan and copper coil. details: copper: Two 20 ft. rolls of 1/4″ copper tubing. vinyl tubing: Two 3 to 4 foot sections of 3/8″ tubing (OD) 1/4″ (ID). pump: 200GPH (from harbor freight). note: the air produced using a «copper coil air cooler» won’t typically be quite as cold as the air from an «ice bucket» air cooler (but the volume of air produced is much greater than an ice bucket air cooler produces) so it’s a trade-off (more air that’s cool vs. less air that’s colder)

Homemade AC — The «Copper Coil» Air Cooler! — (Simple «Box Fan» Conversion) — Easy DIY: 47 комментариев

  • 14.04.2017 в 05:12
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    Why not use a plastic or rubber pipes instead of copper pipe? Copper pipes are very costly. Does it make any difference?

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  • 02.05.2017 в 04:27
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    Try a Stirling cryogenic cooler to produce liquid air to circulate through that copper coil with a vapor tank to reform the liquid air has it boils off from the heat exchange. Could design the cooler motor to operate a pump to circulate the liquid air through the system hay a portable air conditioning unit?

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  • 24.05.2017 в 01:17
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    I'm trying to find one I can make with a 10 inch battery operated fan. And have it all powered with either C or D cell batteries or use a micro usb battery pack.

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  • 28.05.2017 в 06:58
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    HMMM… Could you take a mini fridge and take the shelves out and put the ice bucket in the fridge and cut a very small port through the doors rubber seal? this could prolong the ice replacement time by hours or even make it last days before you need to put a fresh block in! if u want to test this out desertsun02 i may be able to help with the costs of the mini fridge or something bc i would really love to see the results

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  • 13.06.2017 в 23:01
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    Also, has anyone tried putting propylene glycol in with the water? I would expect it to reduce viscosity and increase the heat coefficient and shouldn't affect the copper, but I don't know if most pumps would be happy or not. Also, my impulse is to use distilled water. You'd basically never have to replace it, and it wouldn't gum up the pump or the tubing over time.

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  • 18.06.2017 в 05:26
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    Adding salt may make it colder, but you need to see if the pump would be harmed by this. Corrosion and malfunction could occur in time. I just made this design for my pitbull outside. Going to tighten the coils up some and double insulate the cooler I used to hold the ice and water.

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  • 25.06.2017 в 02:06
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    Hey man. Cool concept. Question" I live in S.C. and we have 90%+ humidity year round. Evaporative coolers won't do squat, but this looks like a much better set up. In your opinion, would this work in high humidity?

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  • 29.06.2017 в 15:12
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    Without the ice how much you think this would cool down the water. ? I am looking for a way to cool the water on my 40W Chinese laser.

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  • 05.07.2017 в 12:22
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    I have an innovation for you. If the air inside the tube enters the copper with a fan or air pump and the copper is immersed in the iced water from the outside, you will get cool air as a result of air friction with the copper pipes. Repeat the process Make the air entrances at least five and the five exits are immersed in cold water with ice.

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  • 12.07.2017 в 02:06
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    ive got a ten foot by ten foot room, which of your homemade air cooler devices do you recommend for dropping the temperature effectively? The room is usually in the late 80s temperature wise with moderate humidity, and we have a lot of electronics in here that crank up the temperature a bit more. Would any of these work and its more a preference for what I want to build, or is there a specific one you recommend?

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  • 12.07.2017 в 09:15
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    my i make a suggestion? I have not made a video on my build but mine was of my brothers doing years ago and I just made some major adjustments to maximize the melting time of the ice. okay so what I recommend you do is use a thermos like this…
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Igloo-1-Gallon-Legend-Jug/16606409?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=5227&adid=22222222228000827930&wl0=&wl1=s&wl2=m&wl3=53954015951&wl4=pla-74597656802&wl5=9014326&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=113836495&wl11=online&wl12=16606409&wl13=&veh=sem
    then you would buy an 80g pump and would buy cold packs. don't use ice. ice melts way to fast. cold packs are meant to stay cooler longer, even when submerged. the part of the igloo were you drink out of you would put the intake and return tubes into. you would have to drill a hole on top for the pump. once you did that you would have a very cold chamber that would not lose its temp for about 12 hours.

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  • 18.07.2017 в 18:55
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    Is the plastic tube attached to both sides of the copper tubing to make a complete loop back to the bucket?

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  • 21.07.2017 в 05:39
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    I think I'm gonna try something like this, but on a larger scale, using my ever flowing natural spring water, a forced air furnace blower, and some ductwork.

    My spring water is usually right around 56 degrees year-round (probably warmer than the contents of your bucket, but will never warm up more than a couple degrees). It flows from the source, to my spring house, which is close to my actual house. So if I can somehow tap into the duct work of the house, I think I'd have a constant supply of approx 56 degree air entering my house for no more than the cost of running a blower motor.

    Glad I found this video, thanks for posting it.

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  • 24.07.2017 в 19:29
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    Mine is not pumping the water through the copper lines. The pump I bought is 70 gph, any suggestions?

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  • 24.07.2017 в 23:41
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    I don't understand the salt on the ice thing unless you agitate the salt and ice otherwise salt melts ice,we used to make homemade icecream and and would layer rocksalt and ice and turn the handle and20 minutes later the milk and egg,cream(etc)would freeze.

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  • 31.07.2017 в 00:01
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    It's really called a cool air evaporator. It doesn't remove humidity but they do cool down a room. They were sold in stores in the 70s.

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  • 31.07.2017 в 19:39
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    the water will move on its own. it's called the Bernoulli principle. you don't need a pump. just copper coil, fan, and bucket of ice and water

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  • 13.08.2017 в 00:24
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    How about a drum high velocity fan with a fin copper coil that covered the front of the fan with a little copper coil on the return flow in the back of the electric motor to help cool the drum fan motor? Then design a sterling cryogenic piston that turns argon gas to liquid that filled an insulated tank with a siphon to charge the copper coils with the liquid argon boil off gas vapor being drawn back to the cryogenic piston to start the cycle all over? Hay even liquid helium could work right?

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  • 20.08.2017 в 04:02
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    I have a furnace with fan capability (furnace not burning). What if I put the coil in front of the intake grate? Will that make the air from the fan a little bit cooler?

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  • 09.09.2017 в 13:06
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    So I made my own without reading any of the comments. I'm using a 75 gph pond pump which is pumping out to 3/8 plastic tube then coupled with brass fittings to 50' of 1/4" copper tubing. The flow is way too slow which only gets the the first few rows of copper tubing cold. My question is does the 3/8 to 1/4 transition matter as long as I have a pump with enough flow. In other words, if I upgrade my pump from a 75gph to something like the 200gph or more which you have my tubing shouldn't make a difference.

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