REAL Beef Bourguignon (Classic French Recipe) Professional Cooking

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This is NOT the usual «quick and easy» method. This is the actual classic approach, which is considerably more work than most people want to do in the kitchen, I know. There is also more technique involved here than probably meets the eye. Don’t feel bad if it doesn’t come out great the first time. Even seasoned professional cooks make mistakes, and there are quite a few things that can go wrong here. I have tried to point them out (be sure to pay attention to the text that appears in the video).

REAL Beef Bourguignon (Classic French Recipe) Professional Cooking: 33 комментария

  • 13.03.2016 в 20:44
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    Seems kinda redundant to brown the meat, toss it with flour, and then roast a second time, when you can just dredge and sear in one step. Also, what is the purpose of boiling the bacon?

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  • 24.05.2016 в 08:05
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    Like it lot, and I bet it tastes just great. We camp every weekend from April to end of October and I was looking for more one way meals in our Dutch Oven. We are in BC Canada but can get some fairly inclement weather so are looking at a one pot meal while we go for a hike. Great video though. Rock on man!! Ant

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  • 07.06.2016 в 21:39
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    I know a chef who makes this dish with filet mignon and I do not like it at all. filet mignon is not peasant food.

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  • 11.07.2016 в 11:39
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    Mate — a truly excellent video. I really appreciate the effort you put in. You deserve every bit of praise you get for this classic demonstration.
    Regards, Tim
    New Zealand

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  • 08.10.2016 в 06:57
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    Excellent video. Can I substitute spam for the beef and grape soda for the wine? Also are the veggies necessary?

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  • 13.10.2016 в 05:45
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    As always, a great video. This seems to be a great recipe. Would you consider other veggies that would hold up to the beef, if so, which ones?

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  • 26.10.2016 в 04:00
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    Just made this for the first time w/ potato galette. I monitored my oven temp with a Thermoworks Chef Alarm. The oven ran hot. It was an unwelcome challenge getting it to hover over 320 F. So the meat came out a bit dry. There wasn't a heck of a lot of liquid to sieve for the next to the last 20 minute cook but enough so when plating it helped balance the dryness. In the future I'll have to add water at whatever step it's called for. Or dial down the braising time a bit. (I tried 2 hours 40 minutes). Or both.

    The potato galette makes the dish more satisfying. You can't leave out potatoes of some kind. And especially if you have garden grown potatoes like I had.

    All in all, a most enjoyable meat and potatoes feast. I'll have to try this again after the New Year.

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  • 18.12.2016 в 05:54
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    I totally love this dish and posted my photos and a link to this video. For me, it didn't turn out as planned as the meat was more jerk-like and candy coated with the sauce. But problems are not unexpected as I used a new brazing dish (well two) and felt the volume of meat was a bit low for the braising dish. Next time I will double the portion up and suspect this will solve the problem.

    It still smelled great, and I love the flavor so I let other people test it out. "It looks burnt…"

    "Smell it!" Got a wow, "Now try the meat…"

    They loved it and told me I created a beefy candy and noted it was still tender on the inside. Not that it was intended, but the best ribs I had took me to the chef and he cooked his ribs points to the point they would fall apart, but toughened them back up with a sear and got pissed at the complaints the sauce was too messy and decided to take things to the point of a candy coating.

    I was so happy to find the brand of wine CookinRussia recommended, and really, it definitely made a difference in the final taste. I am not a red wine person, but the recommended bottle doesn't break the bank and I would also love this as a table wine.

    The real surprise was when people tried the mushrooms and weren't prepared for the taste. They wanted to know what I did to them and in that case, didn't use a fine cognac but a German brandy made from grapes. To me as good as Cognac's best, just can't call it that.

    I had to settle for a chuck roast as the supermarket ditched the butchers that provided me with anything I wanted, to prepackaged, and while fattier, simply changed from pan browning to broiling (could have contributed). This also worked for me.

    I don't have homemade beef stock on hand at this time, and can't bring myself to buy supermarket stock as all I consider it is flavored water. The only substitute for homemade stocks is Campbell's Beef Consume and it worked out very will.

    Not only a great recipe, but a wonderful cooking method I plan to use as I convert a recipe for Garlic Consume, to a stew like dish. To pull that one off I will be incorporating aspects of CookinginRussia's Bourguignon recipes.

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  • 18.12.2016 в 20:01
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    I "love" making these types of dishes, ones which take a little longer than others, requiring a little more effort and attention, my wife will definitely be thanking you for this video too. (BTW, I gave Annie your book on cocktails as part of our wedding anniversary present. She absolutely loves it.)

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  • 15.01.2017 в 00:24
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    Impressive technique… You thought about putting the beef in the freezer (say for about 20-30 mins) before sauteing so that it's really dry?

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  • 01.02.2017 в 06:03
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    Q: are chuck steaks OK to be used for this? I have a 9.5 quart le creuset dutch oven oval shaped — is that a good pot? I'd be making enough for 8 if not 12 people. Thank you.

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  • 18.02.2017 в 19:20
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    Quick question: I've got regular thick sliced bacon, and I have cured salt pork which looks a lot like the bacon you used in the video (has nice lean stripes, does not looks like a blob of lard). Should I be concerned over the amount salt if I use the salt pork over the bacon? According to arithmetic, salt pork has 1365 mg of sodium per 125 grams, and the bacon has 825 mg of sodium.

    Thanks!

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  • 05.03.2017 в 03:01
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    Watched a lot of your videos and in most of them I ended up with a technique dilemma — this one is no different. Here's my question: When you saute the meat and create a fond, you do it on a heat setting somewhere above medium (say, 6 or 7 or more), and you do it in small batches — with ya so far. But after the first batch, and potentially by the THIRD batch of meat browning, I'm afraid that the fond produced from the first batch will have been in the pan/pot so long that it starts to burn. Without having to spend 30 years as a professional chef and find that sweet spot of heat for the particular stove, how would a home chef/cook prevent the fond of batch 1 from burning?

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  • 10.04.2017 в 10:31
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    not one peasant in the history of the world would make this "peasant" stew this way. so many steps one wonders if this guy deliberately added them just to make himself out to be a great innovator…..sorry, stew, even boeuf bourguignon, should not require dozens of steps.

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  • 17.05.2017 в 19:14
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    It is delicious! And I love the process. It was actually tempting to make a development diagram for this one.
    I struggled a bit with the cut of the meat, as here in Czech Republic butchers cut it differently (I will add it to wikipedia, actually), but eventually I bought 3kg of something between plate and brisket. 2 bottles of Cote du Rhone and make Bourgignon and Vindaloo in parallel.
    I marinated them on Saturday, now is Wednesday with Bourgignon already eaten and braising the vindaloo. I hope I haven't left it there too long, but given the amount of garlic it wouldn't spoil anyway, would it? Else I would smell it in the process, I guess. Can't wait.

    Anyway, thank you for existing! I really like your approach and explanations!

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  • 24.06.2017 в 22:05
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    Looks fantastic but maybe you can explain to me why I could never make anything flambé?
    I have used Cognac before but when I try to flame it nothing happens.
    I tried flambéing several things and nothing ever catches on fire.

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  • 26.09.2017 в 00:29
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    Why did you blanch the bacon before rendering? Furthermore, why didn't you use lard to begin with?

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  • 16.10.2017 в 01:52
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    Well, I finally made it and some of the meat is too dry…It was in the oven for 3 hours at 325F…I used a le creuset pot 5 1/4 quart size…Not all the beef is dry/burnt but I think with the kind of pot I am using 3 hours is way too long…What do you think??? Taste wise it's good and the meat that isn't dried/burnt out is very tender and juicy…The shallots completely fell apart, the carrots kept their shape…So did the mushrooms…Served it over noodles…

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