TEDxWindyCity — Mari Gallagher — Food Deserts



Mari talks about Food Desert awareness and solutions, negligence regarding the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and the unapologetic basics of improving public health through «Truth in Data for the Common Good.»

Mari Gallagher is principal of Mari Gallagher Research and Consulting Group, a firm whose expertise includes «going green», immigration, health and wellness projects, and — of course — food deserts.

She is the author of Examining the Impact of Food Deserts on Public Health in Chicago, a breakthrough study which popularized the term «food desert» across the country, and currently writes for the Huffington Post. Venues that have featured her findings include CNN, National Public Radio, Salon.com, USA Today, The Economist, The Chicago Tribune and The Detroit Free Press.

What is TEDx?

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TED has created a program called TEDx. TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. Our event is called TEDxWINDYCITY, where x = independently organized TED event. At our TEDxWINDYCITY event, TEDTalks video and live speakers will combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events, including ours, are self-organized.

This independent TEDx event is operated under license from TED.

TEDxWindyCity — Mari Gallagher — Food Deserts: 11 комментариев

  • 07.04.2013 в 20:56
    Permalink

    I stumped into this TEDx video accidentally and cannot agree more. The food deserts Mari talks about are especially visible for foreigners travelling to US. I have recently had to travel to Utah and Colorado and it's hard if not possible to find healthy food out there that I am used to in Europe. One of the epicenters for me are hotels that I'm staying in. Is there something being done about promoting healthy breakfasts at hotels in US? What about restaurants around shopping centers?

    Ответ
  • 03.09.2013 в 21:29
    Permalink

    Lived in Chicago most of my life, now live in Washington state, big difference. Yes there is some concern about the business's who accept the EBT card, how ever, I do hope that it is not the intent to control where and on what foods a person will have access to. We do need to help provide choice, good choices for everyone.and not control. Don't always trust numbers, I've seen how they harm more than help. Community gardens, and commuity stores, and farmers markets and etc. is the way to go.

    Ответ
  • 27.10.2013 в 14:11
    Permalink

    I used to live in Pasadena, Ca. Now I live in Boyle Heights/East LA. There's a big difference. I hate the politicians that ignore this side of town. They neglect the Hispanic community. For this side of town it's really that these city leaders know they can step over minorities.

    Ответ
  • 22.10.2014 в 17:26
    Permalink

    I am sure that the government doesn't care about how healthy our food is… Knowingly allowing these Processed foods to be so in-expensive, easily accessible to those who are living on a tight budget, or foodstamp programs…  We are worthless to the Rich and the Government…  We are their guinnipigs..  Because when we eat the food we can afford, the Government is able to try out new medications on us to make us feel better, and make us depend on their assistance to get well, when in all reality they are just studying the effects… maybe even to eliminate all the weak  people in the world…
     

    Ответ
  • 21.12.2016 в 02:13
    Permalink

    Holy cow. I knew it was bad in some parts in US cities but this is beyond shocking. It's almost like a different planet. Here in The Netherlands, we have the opposite situation. Fastfood is difficult to find and full service supermarkets with all the bells and whistles are absolutely everywhere. There is a mini-mall in every single neighborhood, no exception. Cheaper ones in some, more upscale ones elsewhere, but usually a mix of both, but basically all providing good, fresh, healthy nutrition at an affordable price to all.

    The food deserts (food is not usually the biggest problem, they are often more like service deserts, which is a huge problem for the aging population) here are mainly in the very small rural towns but even they usually have some sort of co-op, mini supermarket, greengrocer and/or butcher. There usually just isn't a lot of product choice but it's all there and otherwise there is often a larger town a couple of miles down the road where everyone in the larger rural neighborhood does their shopping. It might be helpful to take a look at our model. Our scale is very different though, as our country is very small, very densely populated and very culturally mixed. Thank you, Mari. That was a real eye-opener.

    Ответ
  • 24.05.2017 в 21:43
    Permalink

    Would people who live in these "food desert" areas really eat healthy greens and fruits, and generally eat right, if they were given A CHOICE? I live in the ghetto and there are Subway Sandwich shops everywhere, and those seem to be the same price as a burger soda and fries………………..Same price, so what choice would the average resident in THAT NEIGHBORHOOD choose? That would be a cool experiment wouldn't it? There is a Jewel in my neighborhood and it does have an atrocious produce section, but guess what? There's Cermak Farms down the street which is cheap and healthy. Too many excuses for people's behaviours out there. Many careers to be had on the dyasfunction of certain demographics of our peeps.

    Ответ

Добавить комментарий

Ваш адрес email не будет опубликован. Обязательные поля помечены *